In an ideal world … how to change my address

Recently I moved house.

I  hate moving. Not just for the having to pack everything into boxes at one end then then unpack everything at the destination (which for this move I didn’t have to do!), but mostly because I have to go through the pain that is changing my address.

It turns out that I interact with a lot of organisations, from finance institutions (banks, credit card companies, car insurance, house insurance, health insurance, etc), to official organisations (driver licencing, Medicare, electoral, organ donor register, etc), to community (Red Cross blood donor, 3RRRFM, etc) and mundane organisations (Costco, etc). And that’s just a fraction of them.

I was thinking that, rather than having to fill in what feels like a million forms and waste time that could be spent being a productive public servant or dad for my kid, why isn’t there a central contact details database that I update once? I’m sure that smarter minds than mine have considered this, but I think an opportunity exists for some organisation (government or private) to do this. In the day and age of ‘over-sharing’, are people still averse to putting their address, phone number and email details into a central database? Login security could be addressed using two-factor authentication, such as used by Google Authenticator, or sending a one-time code via SMS or email.

Many services, such as Twitter and Facebook, are set up to authorise other apps to access them. An example of this is when I used my Facebook account to sign up for Freecycle which operates as a Yahoo Group.  I ‘authorised’ Facebook to talk to Yahoo. I’ve also authorised Twicca on my Android smartphone to talk to my Twitter account.

In the same way, in this theoretical single contact details database, I could let the various companies and organisations that I interact with, access my updated contact details. Maybe they could poll this database once a week to look for updated details. I understand they’d have many different backend CRM systems so there may be some manipulation required, but nothing that’s too hard to fix with a bit of scripting.

I could also remove their access when I cease using their services. If I’m not longer banking with Bank A, then I revoke their access so they can’t find out how to contact me.

Does this sound sensible or silly? If sensible why hasn’t Google or someone done this already?

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